Wedding traditions / The wedding dress, veil and garter

The Veil, The White Wedding Dress, The Garter

If you have been reading these posts as I have been sharing them you will realise how much I have been enjoying researching the whys and wherefores of wedding traditions. I could never have imagined half of the information I have found out so far. I do love a ‘useless’ fact! So far I’ve written about the wedding ceremony, the cake and champagne, the history of the rings, the bridal showers, hen parties and stag dos and the tradition of bridesmaids, groomsmen and the best man.

Today we’re going to talk about the bride and the traditions behind what you may wear for your wedding day. This post is all about the wedding dress, veil and garter!

Bride with backless dress walking with groom in Scottish kilt - natural wedding photography by Fiona Kelly London wedding photographer

The Veil

The Ancient Greeks and Romans believed that the veil (along with the bridal party) would serve as protection against evil spirits who were thought to be out to get the bride as she was considered vulnerable to magic. The cynic in me thinks this could be speak for ‘changing her mind’ as it doesn’t sound like women had much choice over who to marry. Over the years the veil has symbolised youth, virginity and modesty, humility and respect. The veils haven’t always been white – Roman brides wore yellow and red (to symbolise fire scaring off the evil spirits), whilst Viking queens wore metal skullcaps! In fact, in Roman times the veil was a complete covering from head to toe and would be later be used as her burial shroud – sort of puts a dampener on proceedings.

The more practical aspect of the veil was that should the groom not like the look of his bride, this delayed the reaction until he had married her and it was too late!  The Victorians changed the meaning of the veil into one of a status symbol where the weight, length and quality were a sign of the position in society. Royal brides had the longest veils and trains of all.

The tradition of the wedding veil and white wedding dress - wedding portrait of bride and groom at Leeds Castle by Fiona Kelly natural wedding photographer Lace sleeve dress like Duchess of Cambridge - The tradition of the wedding veil and white wedding dress - bridal portrait by Fiona Kelly wedding photographer Bride and groom kissing under wedding veil - The tradition of the wedding veil and white wedding dress - black and white creative wedding portrait by Fiona Kelly wedding photographer Elegant slim fitted white wedding dress hanging from wooden beam with lace edged veil - The tradition of the wedding veil and white wedding dress - Fiona Kelly wedding photographer

Headpieces and Crowns

Finnish brides wore crowns adorned with silver and gold – perhaps this might carry over to the flower crown popular trend, which itself derives from pagan and medieval weddings where brides wore crowns made of flowers and herbs.

Magic golden hour - Bride with floral headpiece and short lace sleeves stands with groom in blue blazer - The tradition of the wedding veil and white wedding dress - natural wedding photographer - Fiona Kelly Capturing your wedding story - Black and white photo of bride adjusting veil in back of wedding car - The tradition of the wedding veil and white wedding dress - natural wedding photographer - Fiona Kelly Bride with flower crown at sunset - The tradition of the wedding veil and white wedding dress - natural wedding photographer - Fiona Kelly

The Dress

If you’re having trouble choosing between 2 dresses, don’t choose and wear both! Just a few decades ago it was en vogue to change into a different outfit to leave your wedding reception and travel to your honeymoon destination! Nowadays the bride sometimes selects a slinkier dress or a shorter dress to wear to hit the dance floor! Sometimes the bride may change into a different outfits due to the ceremony representing two cultures.

Bride in short pink lace wedding dress - The tradition of the wedding veil and white wedding dress - natural wedding photographer - Fiona Kelly Bride in short satin wedding dress with groom in blue suit - The tradition of the wedding veil and white wedding dress - natural wedding photographer - Fiona Kelly Capturing your wedding story - Bride in short dress dances with groom in kilt to ceilidh - The tradition of the wedding veil and white wedding dress - natural wedding photographer - Fiona Kelly Bespoke pink lace short wedding dress - The tradition of the wedding veil and white wedding dress - Capturing your wedding story - natural wedding photographer - Fiona Kelly Modern wedding photography - Bride in short satin wedding dress standing with groom in blue suit - The tradition of the wedding veil and white wedding dress - natural wedding photographer - Fiona KellyBride in Chinese wedding outfit - red and gold bride - The tradition of the wedding veil and white wedding dress - natural wedding photographer - Fiona Kelly

The White Wedding Dress

Where did the white wedding dress come from? Back in biblical days, it was blue that represented purity, hence “something blue”. The Greeks used white robes to symbolize youth, joy and purity, but the white wedding dress has not always been fashionable. Today, white or ivory are ever-popular colours but pastel shades and stronger colours are beginning to become more popular again.

Queen Victoria was responsible for a lot of the trends that we see in Western weddings today. She was the one who started the Western world’s white wedding dress trend – before then, brides simply wore their best dress. The then Princess Victoria also established the tradition of playing Wagner’s “Bridal Chorus” during her wedding processional in 1858. In Japan, white was always the colour of choice for bridal ensembles, long before it was popularised it in the Western world. Queen Victoria’s wedding dress was made from white silk satin adorned with intricately ornate Honiton lace. She was the first Royal to wear white and due to the cost of materials for a long time, only the very wealthy wore a similar style. Up until the 1930s, women would often get married in dresses they already owned or buy new, reusable dresses in darker colors that wouldn’t stain. The white, full-skirted “once-in-a-lifetime” wedding dress likely originated with department store bridal salons in the late ’20s, who saw the money-making potential of marketing expensive dresses that women would never wear again.

Before then, wedding dresses had typically followed fashion hemlines of the moment, but the bridal industry attempted to “maximize profits by promoting more expensive floor-length gowns.” That ideal wedding dress was promoted throughout wedding magazines and advertisements. In the ’60s, the Bridal Apparel Association even commissioned studies that attempted to prove that a white wedding dress made for a more stable marriage.

Ivory lace wedding dress - bride getting ready with bridesmaid - The tradition of the wedding veil and white wedding dress - natural wedding photographer - Fiona Kelly Lace sleeve wedding dress hanging on four poster bed - The tradition of the wedding veil and white wedding dress - natural wedding photographer - Fiona Kelly Bride in unstructured loose wedding dress with blonde curls - the tradition of the wedding veil and white wedding dress - natural wedding photographer - Fiona Kelly Lace and voile white wedding dress with short lace sleeves - the tradition of the wedding veil and white wedding dress - natural wedding photographer - Fiona Kelly Big tulle white wedding dress hanging on fishtanks at minimalist venue - the tradition of the wedding veil and white wedding dress - natural wedding photographer - Fiona Kelly

The Garter

Have you been at a wedding where the bride has thrown the garter? This may be more popular in the States, but it derives from a rather intrusive English custom called ‘flinging the stocking’, where guests would steal the bride’s stockings from the wedding chamber to check if the marriage had been consummated, and then take turns flinging them. Whoever threw the one that landed on the groom’s nose would be next to marry. I think I hear brides up and down the country breathing a sigh of relief that this isn’t still a ‘thing’. As if that wasn’t intrusive enough, it used to be the way in France that wedding guests would rip a piece of the bride’s dress off her for good luck, and so the bride would end up standing in rags. Somewhere along the way it was decided that throwing the garter to the guests would be a good way to calm things down. Phew! And so it is now that the garter is sometimes thrown by the groom to his bachelor pals, as an equivalent to throwing the bouquet to the ladies. It was once quite the esteemed prize!

Bride putting on crochet garter - modern wedding photography - the tradition of the wedding veil and white wedding dress - natural wedding photographer - Fiona Kelly The lace garter on a windowsill - modern wedding photography - the tradition of the wedding veil and white wedding dress - natural wedding photographer - Fiona Kelly

The Gloves

Whilst brides wearing gloves may be a rare occasion, gloves were the wedding favour for all guests during the 18th and 19th centuries. Now brides may wear them to represent elegance and grace, but also to remember a vintage era.

The Train

The white wedding dress tradition often includes the debate – How long will the train be? The tradition of the train dates back to the Middle Ages when the length of the train indicated your place in the court hierarchy. The longer the train, the greater the position with the King and Queen.

Hope this latest installment of the Wedding traditions posts has been of interest. If you have any thoughts on any of these traditions I would love to hear from you.

Thanks for popping by.

Fiona x

/*Crazy Egg code - April 2018*/